Wear Your Daff With Pride And Chew On Your Leek

daffodil at bluestone

It’s not often you’ll see daffodils and leeks as the latest fashion accessory, but on Saturday, 1st March you’ll look rather odd if you’re not wearing your daff or chewing on your leek.

Yes, it’s St David’s Day, a national day of celebrations in Wales to celebrate St David, the national patron saint of Wales.

It’s not quite a Bank Holiday, but here at Bluestone National Park Resort we’ll be celebrating the occasion and we’re hoping to see guests marking it with us.

Many will no doubt be heading to St David’s here in Pembrokeshire where the Saint established his monastery in the 6th century. Today you’ll be able to see the amazing cathedral in this tiny city at one of the most western parts of Wales.

But what is it about daffodils, leeks and St David?

Well......

The Leek
According to legend St David told the Britons going into battle with the Saxons to wear leeks so they could tell each other apart. It’s not clear if they all did this, but they did win the battle.

The daffodil
The Welsh name for leek is is Cenhinen and this was the original national emblem of Wales. However, the Welsh name of daffodil is Cenhinen Pedr and over the passage of time people became confused between the names and so the daffodil was named the second national emblem of Wales. 

But don’t get confused between the two if you’re making leek and potato soup!

In the meantime, why not celebrate St David’s Day with a visit to Pembrokeshire, an amazing part of Wales, and find out more about the rich history and heritage we have here.

Or if you can’t manage to get here this weekend, why not plan ahead and find out more about Bluestone and the great free range short break holidays we have to offer.

Categories:Bluestone

Tags:Wales

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Pembrokeshire, in case you weren’t aware, has many secret and amazing locations so ahead of St Davids day on the 1st of March we thought we would make it relevant.

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